New information on Yellowstone Super-Volcano

AUG. 15, 1997 FILE PHOTO

An unidentified pair of visitors to Yellowstone National Park in 1997 photograph the Old Faithful geyser as it rockets 100-feet skyward in Wyoming.    Kevork Djansezian/AP

Molten rock beneath Yellowstone National Park much larger than previously believed, study finds.

The park’s super-volcano has the potential to erupt with a force about 2,000 times the size of Mount St. Helens, according to the study. The last Yellowstone eruption happened 640,000 years ago, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Continue reading

Yellowstone Supervolcano Alert: The Most Dangerous Volcano In America Is Roaring To Life

Michael Snyder
American Dream
October 3, 2013

Right now, the ground underneath Yellowstone National Park is rising at a record rate.  In fact, it is rising at the rate of about three inches per year.  The reason why this is such a concern is because underneath the park sits the Yellowstone supervolcano – the largest volcano in North America.  Scientists tell us that it is inevitable that it will erupt again one day, and when it does the devastation will be almost unimaginable. 

Image: Yellowstone Volcano.

A full-blown eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano would dump a 10 foot deep layer of volcanic ash up to 1,000 miles away, and it would render much of the United States uninhabitable.  When most Americans think of Yellowstone, they tend to conjure up images of Yogi Bear and “Old Faithful”, but the truth is that sleeping underneath Yellowstone is a volcanic beast that could destroy our nation in a single day and now that beast is starting to wake up.

The Yellowstone supervolcano is so vast that it is hard to put it into words.  According to the Daily Mail, the magma “hotspot” underneath Yellowstone is approximately 300 miles wide…

Continue reading

Yellowstone’s Steamboat geyser sees rare eruption

geiser.jpg

July 31, 2013: Steamboat Geyser, in Yellowstone National Park’s Norris Geyser Basin in Wyoming, erupts on Wednesday. (AP)

Published August 01, 2013
Associated Press

Old Faithful it’s not.

Yellowstone National Park’s Steamboat Geyser — the world’s tallest — has erupted for the first time in more than eight years.

The nine-minute blast sent steaming hot water an estimated 200 to 300 feet in the air, park geologist Hank Heasler said Thursday.

Unlike the park’s popular and famous Old Faithful geyser, which spews water like clockwork every hour-and-a-half, no one knows when Steamboat will erupt next.

Continue reading