Swedish company implants microchips in its staff

A Swedish company has implanted microchips in the hands of staff which allows them to use the photocopier, open security doors and even pay for their lunch - the chip is the size of a grain of rice

A Swedish company has implanted microchips in the hands of staff which allows them to use the photocopier, open security doors and even pay for their lunch – the chip is the size of a grain of rice.

Continue reading

N.Korea has ‘significant’ tech to build mini nuclear device: South

North Korean rocket launchers pass through Kim Il-Sung square during a military parade marking the 60th anniversary of the Korean war armistice in Pyongyang on July 27, 2013 (AFP Photo/Ed Jones)

Continue reading

AP Exclusive: Drone sightings up dramatically

FILE – In this March 12, 2014 file photo, a drone flown by Brian Wilson lands after flying over the scene of an explosion that leveled two apartment buildings in the East Harlem neighborhood of New York. The government is receiving reports nearly every day _ and sometimes two or three times a day _ of drones flying near airplanes and helicopters or close to airports without permission, a sharp increase from just two years ago when such reports were still unusual, federal and industry officials familiar with the reports told The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Continue reading

Is this interactive tattoo the future of ‘wearable’ technology?

Project Underskin: The next big thing in wearable technology may be a tattoo implanted in the skin

Project Underskin: The next big thing in wearable technology may be a tattoo implanted in the skin.

Fitbit makers plan interactive inking implanted in the skin

Continue reading

One Step Closer to the Mark of the Beast?

Apple iPhone demo of fingerprint scan technology

An Apple employee, right, instructs a journalist on the use of the fingerprint scanner technology built into the company’s iPhone 5S during a media event held in Beijing, China, Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2013. (AP / Ng Han Guan)

Will 2014 be the beginning of the end for the password?

Continue reading

Scientists begin mapping the genetic blueprint of babies for hundreds of diseases amid raging ethical debate

By Associated Press

PUBLISHED: 12:03 EST, 7 October 2013

This healthy baby girl, Amelia Sloan, became a pioneer for gene mapping shortly after her birth.

Amelia is part of a large research project outside the U.S. capital that is decoding the DNA of hundreds of infants.

New parents in a few other cities soon can start signing up for smaller studies to explore what’s called genome sequencing – fully mapping someone’s genes to look for health risks and should become a part of newborn care.

Scroll down for video

 

Baby Amelia: Holly Sloan interacts with her baby Amelia at their home in Warrenton, Virginia

Baby Amelia: Holly Sloan interacts with her baby Amelia at their home in Warrenton, Virginia (Amelia is part of a large genetic project in the U.S)

However, it’s full of ethical challenges.

Should parents be told only about childhood threats? Or would they also want to learn if their babies carried a key gene for, say, breast cancer after they’re grown?

Could knowing about future risks alter how a family treats an otherwise healthy youngster? And how accurate is this technology. Could it raise too many false alarms?

Continue reading

Innovations for a Violent World

Tens of thousands of Islamic Jihad loyalists gathered in Gaza on October 30, 2009, holding plastic models of rockets and wearing masks and mock suicide bomber’s vests.    Hatem Moussa/AP Photo

7 October, 2013
(Bloomberg.com)  If necessity is the mother of invention, we should be very afraid.Among the thousands of recently granted U.S. patents: an invention to contain suicide bombers, technology that prevents you from getting shot by a friend, and an easier way to grab your gun while in bed so you can, well, rest in peace.

Many of these patents are related to warfare. A search on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s website turned up more than 40 patents granted in the past month that make reference to “warfare,” be it biological, chemical, electronic or urban.

One patent I found is designed to make military exercises more realistic by placing sensors on a soldier’s vest and helmet. When a combatant is hit by an infrared “bullet,” the sensors trigger the discharge of plumes of dust to imitate someone getting hit by actual rounds. The idea here is to give shooters more vivid, real-time feedback on their “kills.”

To find out more about some of these patents, check out our slideshow. That is, if you haven’t crawled back under your covers.

Four-legged, DARPA-funded, running war robot unveiled (VIDEO)

RT
Oct 5, 2013

Developers at Boston Dynamics, an engineering company specializing in robotics, have released video of an untethered robot capable of standing and mobilizing on its own.

WildCat is a four-legged outdoor runner capable of rising, turning, and reaching running speeds up to 16 mph on flat ground.

WildCat is a close cousin to Boston Dynamics’ Cheetah, another quadrupedal robot that was unveiled a year ago, running at speeds over 28 mph on a treadmill – quicker than world’s fastest man Usain Bolt’s top speed of 27.78 mph. However, unlike WildCat, Cheetah was connected to a power source.

The runner carries a large – and very loud – motor to operate its four limbs, though the weight hampers its speed and agility.

Boston Dynamics has not detailed what is next for WildCat, but it is known to have been developed for military use, as the project is part of the Maximum Mobility and Manipulation Program funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA.