MERS virus detected in air samples from Saudi camel barn

The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus is seen in an undated transmission electron micrograph from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).  REUTERS/National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases/Handout via Reuters

The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus is seen in an undated transmission electron micrograph from the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). REUTERS/National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases/Handout via Reuters

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Global Warming or Global Cooling. Which is it?

Photo credit: quemark.com

Commentary by:  Gordon King

I have read many articles today all across the mainstream media saying that we are experiencing global warming.  That the global warming is causing all of the rain and flooding that we have seen around the world.  Then I came across an article with satellite images from NASA that actually show the polar ice caps growing in size.  In fact they apparently have increased in size by 60% from 2012 to 2013.  They can’t both be right.  Which is it?  Maybe government scare tactics, propaganda to promote their “New World Order” agenda?  Scientists around the globe have been telling us for years that humans are creating “global warming”.  I bet that these are the same scientists who believe in evolution and the “Big Bang” theory!  Read the following article and decide for yourself.

I bet it’s all of those electric cars we’ve been buying.  Quick, don’t buy a Prius, sell your cars, it’s now time to purchase a Hummer!  LOL

And now it’s global COOLING! Record return of Arctic ice cap as it grows by 60% in a year

A chilly Arctic summer has left nearly a million more square miles of ocean covered with ice than at the same time last year – an increase of 60 per cent.

The rebound from 2012’s record low comes six years after the BBC reported that global warming would leave the Arctic ice-free in summer by 2013.

Instead, days before the annual autumn re-freeze is due to begin, an unbroken ice sheet more than half the size of Europe already stretches from the Canadian islands to Russia’s northern shores.

global cooling

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Scientists infect mosquitos with bacteria to curb malaria transmission

A mosquito is bloated with blood as it inserts its stinger into human flesh. (AFP)

 By Agence France-Presse

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US scientists have found a way to infect mosquitoes with bacteria in order to break the chain of malaria transmission, according to research published Thursday in a leading scientific journal.

A similar approach has helped cut back on dengue in some locations, and researchers hope that the findings could offer a path toward reducing malaria among the most common mosquitoes in the Middle East and South Asia.

The bacterial infection is inheritable and could be passed on for as many as 34 generations of mosquitoes, rendering them immune to malaria parasites, reported experts from the National Institutes of Health in the journal Science.

Scientists injected Anopheles mosquito embryos with Wolbachia, a common insect bacterium. When the mosquitoes matured, they bred the adult females with uninfected males.

The infection endured for 34 generations of mosquitoes. The study ended at that point, so it remains unknown how much longer the bacterial infection would have been passed on, preventing malaria transmission.

Researchers also tried introducing the bacterial infection in small numbers of adult mosquitoes, between five and 20 percent of females in a given population.

Within eight generations, all of the mosquitoes were infected with the malaria-blocking infection.

The evidence supports the “potential of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes as a malaria control strategy,” said the study.

Previous research has shown the bacterium could prevent malaria-inducing Plasmodium parasites from developing in Anopheles mosquitoes.

But in this study, scientists were able to show for the first time that they could create mosquitoes with a stable Wolbachia infection that passed consistently from mother to offspring.

Researchers also discovered that the infection killed malaria parasites both in the mosquitoes’ guts and in the salivary glands, the main avenue for transmission to humans via mosquito bites.

About 660,000 people die worldwide every year from malaria.

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