Doctors warn unprecedented back-to-school lung virus that has hospitalized hundreds of children in ten states will spread across the country

Widespread: The virus has already been reported across 10 states - Missouri, Kansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Iowa, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Carolina, and Georgia - and is likely to spread, doctors say

Widespread: The virus has already been reported across 10 states – Missouri, Kansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Iowa, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Carolina, and Georgia – and is likely to spread, doctors say.

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15 patients in 3 states possibly exposed to fatal brain disease

Sep. 6, 2013 at 6:49 PM ET

Fifteen people in three states now have been warned that they may have been exposed to a rare and fatal brain disease through potentially contaminated surgical equipment, health officials said Friday.

In addition to eight patients in New Hampshire, five in Massachusetts and two in Connecticut have received the news that they may have shared tainted equipment with a patient who died from apparent Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, an invariably fatal brain disorder, those states confirmed.

The initial patient had brain surgery in May at Catholic Medical Center in Manchester, N.H. Officials there are waiting for autopsy results, but say the patient likely suffered from sporadic CJD, which pops up spontaneously. It’s not the variant form of CJD that causes a human form of “mad cow disease” and is associated with eating beef contaminated with the cattle version, called bovine spongiform encephalopathy or BSE, experts caution.

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Mutated virus heightens polio worries

In recent months, the PM Polio Cell has registered 22 polio cases in all. Most of them were reported from Fata, different parts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan. — File Photo by AP

www.dawn.com

ISLAMABAD, July 29: A rare and dangerous strain of a mutated polio virus has reappeared in Pakistan to the dread of the long-time polio-free world.

Dr Alias Durray, chief of the World Health Organisation’s polio eradication programme in Pakistan, confirmed to Dawn that the strain, which has close genetic similarities with the globally eradicated P2 strain, has paralysed a baby boy in Mastung district of Balochistan.

This latest case has followed the one reported from Jafarabad district of the province in May this year. Mastung and Jafarabad district are 300 kilometres apart.

The polio virus has three types of strains termed P1, P2 or P3 strain. Immunity from any one strain does not protect a person from the other strains. The P2 virus had been eradicated globally in 1998, and only the P1 and P3 strains remain.

What is sad is that a strain similar to the mutated polio virus had been stopped after it first broke out and struck 15 children in Qila Abdullah area of Balochistan in 2011.

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Rare Superbug Spreads in US

Rare superbug emerging in U.S. elicits advisory warning from CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is alerting clinicians of an emerging untreatable multidrug-resistant organism in the United States.

There are many forms of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), but of the 37 forms reported in the U.S., 15 have been reported in less than a year.

The CDC said the increase in CRE means health care providers need to “act aggressively to prevent the emergence and spread of these unusual CRE organisms.”

Enterobacteriaceae lives in water, soil and the human gut. These “surperbugs” have developed high levels of resistance to antibiotics – even carbapanems. Individuals who usually develop CRE infections are those who are taking antibiotics and getting significant medical treatment for other conditions.

The majority of CRE were “isolated from patients who received overnight medical treatment outside of the United States,” according to the CDC.

Health care providers that encounter CRE infections should follow the CDC’s recommendations in the 2012 CRE toolkit.

Persons who shared a room with a patient who has a CRE infection – and maybe even health care providers who treated the infected patient – should be screened to make sure they have not caught the infection.

If the infected patient is transferred to another health care facility, the new facility should become aware of the CRE infection. Health care providers who care for infected patients should not treat other non-infected patients.

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