US Hospital: Surgeon with Ebola ‘extremely ill’

Health workers in protective suits transport Dr. Martin Salia, a surgeon working in Sierra Leone who had been diagnosed with Ebola, from a jet that brought him from Sierra Leone to a waiting ambulance that will take him to the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014. Dr. Salia is the third Ebola patient at the Omaha hospital and the 10th person with Ebola to be treated in the U.S. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

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Russian doctor batters heart patient in ICU

Andrey Votyakov was caught on camera striking the man hours after he’d undergone surgery. The man later died.

Votyakov struck the man on his head and chest.

WitiNews via YouTube

Votyakov struck the man on his head and chest.

SOURCE

Shocking footage shows the moment a Russian doctor viciously beat a sick heart patient in his own hospital bed.

Andrey Votyakov was caught on camera battering the middle-aged man, who was lying in the intensive care unit, just hours after he’d undergone surgery at a hospital in Perm.

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Cash-only doctors abandon the insurance system

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Fed up with declining payments and rising red tape, a small but growing number of doctors is opting out of the insurance system completely. They’re expecting patients to pony up with cash.

Some doctors who have gone that route love it, saying they can spend more time with and provide higher-quality care to their patients. Health advocates are skeptical, worrying that only the wealthy will benefit from this system.

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IRS targeted groups that criticized the government, IG report says

IRS targeting those who speak out against the government

Juliet Eilperin
The Washington Post
May 13, 2013

At various points over the past two years, Internal Revenue Service officials targeted nonprofit groups that criticized the government and sought to educate Americans about the U.S. Constitution, according to documents in an audit conducted by the agency’s inspector general.

The documents, obtained by The Washington Post  from a congressional aide with knowledge of the findings, show that on June 29, 2011, IRS staffers held a briefing with senior agency official Lois G. Lerner in which they described giving special attention to instances where “statements in the case file criticize how the country is being run.” Lerner, who  oversees tax-exempt groups for the agency, raised objections and the agency revised its criteria a week later.

But six months later, the IRS applied a new political test to groups that applied for tax-exempt status as “social welfare” groups, the document says. On Jan. 15, 2012 the agency decided to target “political action type organizations involved in limiting/expanding Government, educating on the Constitution and Bill of Rights, social economic reform movement.,” according to the appendix in the IG report, which was requested by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee and has yet to be released.

The new revelations are likely to intensify criticism of the IRS, which has been under fire since agency officials acknowledged they had deliberately targeted groups with “tea party” or “patriot” in their name for heightened scrutiny.

Full story here.

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Chinese doctors nearly come to blows at bedside of terminal patient over who gets his organs

Rival Chinese doctors nearly came to blows after attempting, quite literally, to win over the heart of a terminal patient.

Rival Chinese doctors nearly came to blows after attempting, quite literally, to win over the heart of a terminal patient.

Photo: Alamy

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Xu Bao, a cancer patient in the Chinese city of Hefei, had agreed to donate his corneas and other organs after his death, according to local media reports.

But when representatives from two different transplant groups arrived at his bedside to arrange the donations – in one case bearing flowers – the scene degenerated into a verbal fight over which side would get the organs.

Zhang Yidong, a friend of the terminally ill patient, told the Global Times newspaper the doctors began “bickering for Xu’s body parts” while the patient was still in the room.

“Xu felt terrible and decided to renege,” Mr Zhang said, adding that his friend’s dream of donating his organs had been “ruined”.

A local television reporter who had been at the hospital to document Mr Xu’s selfless act told the Nandu Daily newspaper the standoff had been “awkward”.

The unseemly squabble may be explained by China’s chronic shortage of organ donors. About 1.5 million Chinese people need transplants but a lack of donors mean only 10,000 are performed each year, China’s state-run CCTV reported last year.

“Currently, a vast majority of organs come from executed felons,” the channel admitted.

Last year health authorities announced they would seek to limit the use of organs from executed prisoners over the coming years. Officials said the country would instead rely on a new national donation system for organ transplants.

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