Tenn. couple accused of locking three adopted kids in bedroom, shed for six months

Will Earnest Cater, 53, and his wife, Wylie Sue Cater, 43, accused of locking three kids in bedroom, shed for 6 months.

Will Earnest Cater, 53, and his wife Wylie Sue Cater, 43, are charged with false imprisonment and three counts of aggravated child abuse after allegedly locking their adopted children up when not in school.      Tipton County Sheriff’s Office

One of the children reported the abhorrent abuse to police this week, saying they were only allowed out of their designated areas to come in for breakfast and go to school, WREG reported.

Three girls escape from Tucson, Ariz. home after two years held captive: cops

  Tucson Police Department investigators and evidence technicians investigate the scene of a child abuse call that began in the early morning of Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013, in the 2800 block of North Estrella Avenue. 

Tucson Police Department investigators and evidence technicians investigate the scene of a child abuse call that began in the early morning of Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013, in the 2800 block of North Estrella Avenue.

The girls, aged 12, 13 and 17, were held separately in the home and haven’t had a bath in almost half a year. They told cops their captors, their mother and stepfather, fed them only once a day. The adults are in police custody.

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Four malnourished children who could only communicate in grunts when they were found living in feces-ridden home were known to child welfare for a YEAR

Wayne Sperling
Lorinda Bailey

Charged: The father of the children, Wayne Sperling, 66, is also charged with child abuse after the children were found living at his filthy home. Bailey, 35, lived in a different part of the block but saw them daily

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Parents Imprison Son For 3 Months

Delaware couple accused of locking 12-year-old boy in his room for 3 months

Published March 21, 2013

SOURCE

NEWARK, Del. –  A Delaware couple has been indicted for allegedly locking their 12-year-old son in his room for three months.

Police in New Castle County arrested 41-year-old Robert Hohn III and 39-year-old Shannon Watterson in late November after the malnourished and barefoot boy escaped to a neighbor’s home. A New Castle County grand jury indicted the couple Monday.

Hohn, the boy’s father, and Watterson, his stepmother, are facing one count each of felony first-degree child abuse, endangering the welfare of a child and conspiracy as well as unlawful imprisonment and eight counts of misdemeanor endangering the welfare of a child.

Police say the boy had been locked in his room from September to late November and allowed to leave only when he had to use the bathroom.

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Parents Lock Up Son, Starve Him Then Ship Him to California

Georgia parents plead guilty to locking up and starving their son for years before buying him a one-way ticket to California and throwing away all traces of his childhood

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A couple from Georgia have been sentenced to 15 years in prison after pleading guilty to locking up and starving their teenage son for years before buying him a one-way bus ticket to California.

Paul and Sheila Comer held Sheila’s son, Mitch Comer, captive for at least three years at their Paulding County home until he was found by police weighing just 87 pounds last September.

On his 18th birthday, they had bought him a one-way bus ticket for California, gave him pamphlets for homeless shelters and threw away all reminders of him, from his school work to baby shoes.

But he was spotted wandering around downtown Los Angeles by a retired police officer who thought the boy, who had near translucent skin from so little sunlight, was around 12 years old.

 
In court: A couple has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for locking up their son for yearsIn court: A couple has been sentenced to 15 years in prison for locking up their son for years

He told investigators that he had not seen sunlight in two years, and listed the abuse he had suffered at the hands of his parents, including how he would have to beg for food.

On Thursday, the couple were silent as they shuffled into the Paulding County courtroom, where they were sentenced to 30 years, half of which they will serve on probation.

 They pleaded guilty, meaning they avoided possible sentences of more than 100 years behind bars. It also meant there was no trial, at which their children would have had to testify.

As a condition of the deal, the Comers must also forfeit all of their assets, which will go into a trust fund for their three children, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported.

 
Sheila Comer
Paul Comer
 

Cruel: Sheila and Paul Comer, pictured last October, bought him a one-way bus ticket to California on his 18th birthday, gave him pamphlets telling him where to find homeless shelters and told him never to return

 

 
Abuse: Their son, Mitch, weighed just 87 pounds when he was found wandering in L.A. by a police officerAbuse: Their son, Mitch, weighed just 87 pounds when he was found wandering in L.A. by a police officer

Half of the money will go to Mitch, who has been placed with a foster family in the area, and the remaining to the couple’s two younger daughters, who are also in foster care.

The couple have still not said what led them to abuse the boy, but they claimed it was Mitch who wanted to go to California so he could be an actor.

‘We have no idea why it happened,’ Paulding County District Attorney Dick Donovan said. ‘I don’t know why God makes people that are mean like that. I don’t think he makes people mean, but I don’t know why there are mean people like that. I really don’t.’

Since returning to Georgia, the boy has gone from strength to strength, Donovan said. He had the choice of attending the hearing but chose to go to school instead.

 
Sheila Comer
Paul Comer
 

Locked up: The couple, who also have two daughters, will serve 15 years in jail and 15 on probation

Mitch Comer was just 5′ 1″ and weighed only 87 pounds when he was found wandering around downtown Los Angeles. 

Mitch told investigators he was confined to a bathroom and bedroom for years and wasn’t fed often, occasionally getting soup or cereal but little of substance, Morgan said. 

Arrest warrants filed in Georgia said the Comers ‘made Mitch kneel on the floor, bend his head and place his forehead against the wall, and place his hands behind his head for long periods of time’.

The Comers’ two daughters, who are 11 and 13, told investigators they heard him cry and scream for food often, Morgan said.

The boy was kept in such seclusion that his two younger sisters in the same house did not know what he looked like, the authorities revealed.

 
Scene: State and local officials prepare to search the Comers' home last September after Mitch was foundScene: State and local officials prepare to search the Comers’ home last September after Mitch was found

‘The sisters haven’t seen the brother in over two years,’ said Paulding’s Cpl. Ashley Henson. ‘They didn’t even know what color his hair was.’

After he was spotted wandering the streets of Los Angeles in September, police in California contacted the Paulding County Sheriff’s Office, which launched an investigation.

The day after Mitch was found, the Comers were arrested at their Paulding home on child cruelty charges. They were indicted in October and denied bond in November.

The Comers had no prior criminal history, but were the subject of a 2009 investigation by local authorities following an abuse allegation when the family lived in Cherokee County. 

The case was referred to the Cherokee Sheriff’s Office, but was later closed, and no charges were filed.

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Ohio Couple Admits Putting Kids in Plastic Boxes

news-general-20130123-Ohio.Kids.In.Boxes

“This combo made from undated photos released by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department shows James Taylor, right, and his wife Samantha”.

www.xfinity.comcast.net  –  The Associated Press

The couple on Tuesday Jan. 22, 2013 each pleaded guilty to two counts of child endangerment and one count of unlawful restraint after punishing their three children by forcing them into plastic storage boxes sealed with duct tape and only a square cut in the top for air.

STEUBENVILLE – An eastern Ohio couple pleaded guilty to punishing their three children by forcing them into plastic storage boxes sealed with duct tape and only a square cut in the top for air.

A prosecutor said the children, ages 5, 6 and 8, were crammed into the boxes as punishment June 16 at the family home in Steubenville while the parents went to the grocery store and left two uncles at home with them. A friend of the family arrived at the house, got the children out of the boxes and contacted police.

Their father, James Taylor, pleaded guilty Tuesday to two counts of child endangerment and one count of unlawful restraint. The plea deal calls for a year in jail. His wife, Samantha Taylor, the children’s stepmother, pleaded guilty to the same charges and likely will serve two years of probation.

The clerk’s office said a sentencing date for the pair has not been set.

The two uncles pleaded guilty to unlawful restraint and were sentenced to a year of probation. Prosecutors said they helped put the children in the boxes, with one of them cutting the air holes.

Authorities said the children were in the boxes for about 15 to 30 minutes, with square holes cut out of the lids to expose the top part of their faces. There was no indication they had been put in the boxes before, but Jefferson County prosecutor Jeffrey J. Bruzzese said it was part of a cycle of abuse by the parents that included having weights dropped on their feet.

Bruzzese said it was apparent that water was dumped on top of the children while they were restrained in the totes. All the punishment was meted out at James Taylor’s direction, the prosecutor said.

Bruzzese told WTOV-TV that the children are now living with relatives and doing well. He did not return a call to The Associated Press on Wednesday.

Steubenville is on the Ohio-West Virginia border, about 150 miles east of Columbus.

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Police: Calif. Teens Drug Parents to Use Internet

www.abcnews.go.com   AP

Two California teenagers were arrested after they gave one of the girl’s parents milkshakes spiked with prescription sleeping pills so she could use the Internet past her curfew, police said.

The medicated shakes worked, but the parents became suspicious when they woke up groggy the next morning, Rocklin police Lt. Lon Milka told The Sacramento Bee in a story Thursday.  They obtained a drug kit from police so they could test themselves for tampering,

The tests came back positive, and the couple went back to police with the results. Their 15-year-old daughter and her 16-year-old friend were taken to Juvenile Hall on Saturday and booked on suspicion of conspiracy and willfully mingling a pharmaceutical with food, Milka said.

Child therapist Leslie Whitten Baughman told The Bee that while it is normal for adolescents to act out while asserting their individuality, drugging their parents “would not be a healthy level of rebellion.”

Milka said the younger girl told investigators that she thought her parents’ Internet policy was too strict. Internet access at the family’s home was shut off every night at 10, he said.

“The girls wanted to use the Internet, and they’d go to whatever means they had to,” he said.

Authorities are not identifying the teens because they are minors. Placer County prosecutors have not yet decided whether to file charges.

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Disney Channel Delights Gays With ‘Two Moms’ In ‘Make Your Mark’ Ad

www.newsbusters.org   –   By Tim Graham

The Disney Channel has disgusted gay activists by “failing” to have “out gay characters” on its programming for children. But right now, the gays are thrilled by the channel’s ad campaign “Make Your Mark” for featuring a 14-year-old named Ben, an aspiring filmmaker who made a film against bullying and  “happens to have two moms.”

At AfterElton.com, blogger Ed Kennedy was glowing. “At the 0:12 mark, when he’s showing us a bit about his life, he shows us his moms. Plural, with their arms around each other. It’s the briefest of moments in a remarkable enough story, but it stopped me cold.” (Video below)

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“It’s such a small moment, but it was powerful to me, and I have a feeling it speaks volumes to kids with two moms or kids with two dads. What’s even more remarkable is that the video is airing during the dinner hour, and has been since early November, and [the American Family Association’s] One Million Moms hasn’t made a squeak,” Kennedy reported.

“We tried to get Nickelodeon and Disney to open up  about why they have no openly gay teens on their programs back in 2010, and basically met a stone wall. They didn’t even understand the question. And while this isn’t a gay kid, it’s one of the few instances outside of Degrassi that Disney Channel or Nickelodeon has shown that gay people exist in the world.”

As MRC founder Brent Bozell has explained,

TeenNick’s grope opera “Degrassi” has had eight gay characters and is now normalizing “Adam,” a female-to-male transgender teen. Co-creator Linda Schuyler proclaimed, “People are realizing that the lines of sexuality are not just drawn between gay guys and lesbian girls, but there is a sliding scale of sexuality, and that’s something new.”

No one should be surprised that [Jennifer] Armstrong [of Entertainment Weekly] and her GLAAD allies are also pushing to take the pro-gay message  to grade-schoolers. Armstrong complained gay characters are “entirely absent from mainstream sitcoms and tween networks like Disney Channel and Nickelodeon.” Disney Channel issued the magazine a vague statement about their “responsibility to present age-appropriate programming for millions of kids age 6-14 around the world.”

“Age-appropriate” is not a term these activists recognize.

They were disgusted when Disney executive Gary Marsh said in 2008, “There have been characters on Disney Channel who I think people have thought were gay. That’s for the audience to interpret.” The activists want Disney to lead the way toward “LGBT” acceptance among the grade-school set.
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