Bangladesh restricts Rohingya refugees, starts immunization

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Rohingya Muslim man Abdul Kareem walks towards a refugee camp carrying his mother Alima Khatoon after crossing over from Myanmar into Bangladesh, at Teknaf, Bangladesh, Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017. United Nations agencies say an estimated 409,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled to Bangladesh since Aug. 25, when deadly attacks by a Rohingya insurgent group on police posts prompted Myanmar’s military to launch “clearance operations” in Rakhine state. Those fleeing have described indiscriminate attacks by security forces and Buddhist mobs. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin)

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Nearly 100 bodies pulled from landslide at Myanmar jade mine

People look for the bodies of miners killed by a landslide in Hpakant jade mine in Kachin state November 21, 2015. Picture taken November 21, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

People look for the bodies of miners killed by a landslide in Hpakant jade mine in Kachin state November 21, 2015. Picture taken November 21, 2015. REUTERS/Stringer

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Myanmar floods: President declares state of emergency

Myanmar flooding 1 August 2015

A journalist with the Democratic Voice of Burma did a live news report while standing in chest high flood waters.

Myanmar’s president has declared a state of emergency in four regions after heavy floods left 27 people dead

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1,000 migrants land in Indonesia, Thailand in growing crisis

Newly arrived Bangladeshi migrants pour water on the head of a man who had fainted at Kuala Langsa Port in Langsa, Aceh province, Indonesia, Friday, May 15, 2015. Hundreds of Bangladeshi and ethnic Rohingya migrants have landed on the shores of Indonesia and Thailand after being adrift at sea for weeks, authorities said Friday. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara)

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Myanmar street kids turn to sniffing glue to forget hunger

In this Dec. 22, 2014 photo, a street child sniffs glue from a tin in the foreground of a roadside garbage dump in Hlaing Tharyar, northwest of Yangon, Myanmar. Since the lifting of Western sanctions, more than 500 foreign businesses have invested $50 billion in Myanmar. But as poor families move from rural areas to the big city in hopes of finding work, many find them selves struggling to get by. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

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Dozens of Rohingya missing after boat sinks off Myanmar

Migrants from Myanmar's Muslim-minority Rohingya at a detention centre after they were rounded up in raids on hidden camps in Thailand's southern province of Narathiwat on January 16, 2013.— AFP pic

Migrants from Myanmar’s Muslim-minority Rohingya at a detention centre after they were rounded up in raids on hidden camps in Thailand’s southern province of Narathiwat on January 16, 2013.— AFP pic

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20 dead in Buddhist-Muslim clashes in Myanmar

1,200 Muslim families flee their homes, says official, as sectarian strife reaches boiling point

March 22, 2013

SOURCE

MEIKHTILA, Myanmar (AP) — Burning fires from two days of Buddhist-Muslim violence that killed at least 20 people smoldered across a central Myanmar town Friday as residents cowered indoors amid growing fears the country’s latest bout of sectarian bloodshed could spread.

The government’s struggle to contain the unrest in Meikhtila is proving another major challenge for President Thein Sein’s reformist administration as it attempts to chart a path to democracy after nearly half a century of military rule that once crushed all dissent.

The scenes in Meikhtila, where homes and at least five mosques have been torched by angry mobs, were ominously reminiscent of the sectarian violence between ethnic Rakhine Buddhists and Muslim Rohingya that shook western Rakhine state last year, killing hundreds of people and driving more than 100,000 from their homes.

The clashes in Meikhtila — which was tense but calm Friday — are the first reported in central Myanmar since then.

Troubles began Wednesday after an argument broke out between a Muslim gold shop owner and his Buddhist customers. A Buddhist monk was among the first killed, inflaming tensions that led a Buddhist mob to rampage through a Muslim neighborhood.

Violence continued Thursday, and by Friday, Win Htein, a local lawmaker from the opposition National League for Democracy, said he had counted at least 20 bodies. He said 1,200 Muslim families — at least 6,000 people — have fled their homes and taken refuge at a stadium and a police station.

On Friday, police seized knives, swords, hammers and sticks from young men in the streets and detained scores of looters.

Fires set to Muslim homes continued to burn, but angry Buddhist residents and monks prevented authorities from putting out the blazes.

It was difficult to determine the extent of destruction in the town because residents were too afraid to walk the streets and were sheltering in monasteries or other locations away from the violence.

“We don’t feel safe and we have now moved inside a monastery,” said Sein Shwe, a shop owner. “The situation is unpredictable and dangerous.”

Some monks accosted and threatened journalists trying to cover the unrest, at one point trying to drag a group of several out of a van. One monk, whose faced was covered, shoved a foot-long dagger at the neck of an Associated Press photographer and demanded his camera. The photographer defused the situation by handing over his camera’s memory card.

The group of nine journalists took refuge in a monastery and stayed there until a police unit was able to escort them to safety.

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