Hot off the Grill: Test Tube Burger

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Commentary By: Gordon King

So this is what it’s come to.  Test tube meat?  Synthetic hamburger?  Sounds delicious doesn’t it?  Not!  Have we gone so far over the edge that our next meal will come from a test tube?  You know we are living in the end times when all living organisms are now engineered or manipulated in test tubes.  Plants, animals, fuel, babies and now our meat!  What’s next on the world agenda?   Hmmm….sort of reminds me of a movie I once saw…”Soylent Green”!  Does something sound fishy here or is it just me?  The bible talks about genetic manipulation in the days of Noah with the Nephilim.  He also says that the end times will be like that in the days of Noah!  In Genesis 6:4 “There were giants in the earth in those days; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown.”  And also after that, meaning the Nephilim would be around after the flood!  I believe that the Nephilim are among us now and are playing a role in all of this genetic manipulation.  What do you think?

SOURCE

A Dutch scientist hopes he’ll change minds about the viability of test tube meat when his first genetically engineered hamburger, made from billions of stem cells, is served hot off the grill.

Mark Post, the head of physiology at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, has spent years growing the synthetic hamburger from bovine stem cells, which his team turned into thin strips of muscle tissue before mincing them into a patty.

While the process has taken time and run up considerable expense – the project received $325,000 from an anonymous donor – Post told the New York Times he hoped the cost of cultured meat could come down in the future, making it a viable food source.

After conducting an informal tasting, Post gave the synthetic tissue his seal of approval, telling the Times, it “tastes reasonably good” and that he planned to add just salt and pepper before serving it, perhaps at an event in London this summer.

Post told ABC News in 2011 that he expected meat consumption to double in the next 40 years.

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Analysis Finds 55% Ground Beef, 39% Chicken Contaminated with Superbugs

Elizabeth Renter
Infowars.com
April 20, 2013

Would you still eat that turkey burger if you knew it contained antibiotic resistant bacteria? Maybe not. But if you eat turkey, there’s a good chance you are ingesting some of these potentially lethal “super bugs”. The same holds true for beef, chicken, and pork, according to a recent analysis from the Environmental Working Group.

The EWG analyzed tests recently released from the federal government, and what they found was that a great deal of American meat is contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. More specifically, the EWG found the following contamination levels:

  • 81% of raw ground turkey
  • 69% of pork chops
  • 55% of raw ground beef
  • 39% of raw chicken

With the vast majority of U.S.-made pharmaceuticals going into livestock production, how could this possibly be? It’s because the superbugs are created in part by an overabundance of antibiotics. Sounds a little backwards, right? Well, bacteria are living things; they evolve and change to survive just like humans or animals do. And to this end, when something threatens them, they adjust to build defenses. This is how powerful bacteria become impervious to potent antibiotics.

MedicalNewsToday reports that 30 million pounds of antibiotics were sold in 2011. This marks an increase of 22% since 2005. And somewhere around 80% of those drugs went to meat production. As we pump more and more antibiotics into the food system, we will likely see a greater concentration, variety, and fallout of these superbugs.

The EWG says the source of the problem isn’t being addressed. The cause of proliferation of illness and bacteria among livestock is largely the conditions in which we raise them. In other words, large scale feeding operations where cattle, chicken, and other livestock are forced to live on top of each other in their own filth certainly does nothing to encourage healthy animals.

“Congress should also fully fund the Conservation Stewardship Program, which encourages conservation activities on grassland, pastureland and rangeland. This program, run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, could be used to support ranchers who raise animals on pasture and employ practices that fortify health.

For example, unlike operations that confine a large number of animals to a small area, rotational grazing allows animals access to open space. This practice improves herd health and reduces the risk of infection or sickness that would otherwise spread easily,” the Environmental Working Group reports.

Antibiotic resistant superbugs found in livestock can and will make their way into humans. One already has. Known as Pig MRSA, Methcillin-resistant Staphoylococcus aureus CC398 is no longer just for pigs. That having been said, if you knew your turkey burger was infected with a “superbug”, would you still eat it?

Until the issue is addressed, it’s important to consider limiting meat consumption. Some farmers are doing their part by not only being independent from large-scale CAFO’s, but also by replacing antibiotics with natural substances like cinnamon and oregano oil.

Elizabeth Renter’s article first appeared at NaturalSociety.com.

This article was posted: Saturday, April 20, 2013 at 1:29 pm

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Has DOG meat been found in our food?

New takeaway horror after experts discover ‘mystery meat’ in a lamb curry

  • Samples of curries and kebabs from six outlets in London were tested
  • The meat in a lamb curry could not be identified as common animal source
  • One burger contained no beef at all other than blood and heart
  • Beef in another dish was found to contain chicken material including blood

Daily Mail

By Sean Poulter

 mystery meat, which has defied the best efforts of scientists to identify it, has been found in a lamb curry as part of an investigation into food fraud.

The discovery raises new questions about just what is going into the nation’s takeaways and processed foods.

A BBC documentary to be aired on BBC3 tonight sent samples of curries and kebabs bought from six outlets in London for laboratory tests.

 
Tests: A documentary team sent meat samples from six London takeaways to be tested. Meat from one lamb curry could not be identified as originating from any common meat source (stock image) Tests: A documentary team sent meat samples from six London takeaways to be tested. Meat from one lamb curry could not be identified as originating from any common meat source (stock image)

The meat in a Beef in Black Bean Sauce dish turned out to contain high levels of chicken material including blood, while a burger contained no beef at all, other than blood and heart.

However, most alarming of all was a curry. A spokesman for the programme said: ‘Just when we thought things couldn’t get any worse, the results came in for an Indian Lamb Curry.

‘It did contain meat, but that meat was not lamb, not pork, nor was it chicken or beef. Not horse, and not goat either.’

Worry: A burger that was tested contained no beef at all, other than blood and heart Worry: A burger that was tested contained no beef at all, other than blood and heart

All of the many tests to date by the lab used by the programme have failed to identify exactly which animal was the source of the meat.

The revelation raises many grim possibilities. There is evidence from Spain, for example, of meat from dog carcasses being processed for use in pet food.

This is not the first time that a question mark has been put over the content of the take-out dishes eaten by millions of Britons every day.

Just last year, a survey of 20 lamb curries in the West Midlands found all had been bulked up with cheaper beef, pork and chicken.

Amazingly, four contained no lamb at all, rather the outlets used either beef or chicken which was hidden beneath a powerful and spicy sauce.

At the same time, a meat cutting plant in Wales has been accused of supplying horsemeat from an abattoir in Yorkshire to companies making kebabs and burgers for hundreds of independent take-aways.

The discovery of horsemeat in big brand products sold by supermarkets like Tesco and Asda, together with chains like Burger King and big brands from Birds Eye to Findus, has changed the nation’s shopping habits. The implication of take-out curries in food fraud could also hit the industry hard.

Horsemeat Banquet, BBC Three, March 27, 10pm.