Moroccan parliament moves to outlaw contacts with Israelis

Moroccan Parliament building in Rabat (photo credit: Treasury Tag/Wikimedia Commons)

Even private dealings would be punishable by imprisonment; local NGO calls bill ‘inhuman’ and ‘influenced by Nazi tendencies’

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UN reports widespread human rights abuses in Iran

A blindfolded man waits to be hanged in public, as two police officers look on, in Shiraz, Iran, on April 16, 2011 (photo credit: AP/Mehr News Agency/Mohammad Hadi Khosravi)

New document cites rise in number of jailed journalists, censorship of 5 million websites and persecution of minorities

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Some of US drone attacks unlawful: Amnesty

In this Dec. 10, 2010 file photo, Pakistani tribal villagers hold a rally to condemn the U.S. drone attacks on their villages, in Islamabad. Amnesty International calls on the U.S. to investigate reported civilian casualties from CIA drone strikes in Pakistan and compensate victims in a report providing new details about innocent citizens allegedly killed in the attacks.

In this Dec. 10, 2010 file photo, Pakistani tribal villagers hold a rally to condemn the U.S. drone attacks on their villages, in Islamabad. Amnesty International calls on the U.S. to investigate reported civilian casualties from CIA drone strikes in Pakistan and compensate victims in a report providing new details about innocent citizens allegedly killed in the attacks.

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Shocking video: Sudanese woman flogged for getting into car with man who isn’t related to her

A woman, identified as Halima, crouches on the ground while a police officer flogs her with his whip.

via YouTube

A woman, identified as Halima, crouches on the ground while a police officer flogs her with his whip.

Sudan’s public order law lets police officers publicly whip women who are accused of public indecency. The woman in this YouTube video was reportedly riding in a car with a man who wasn’t her husband or an immediate family member.

SOURCEA disturbing new YouTube video shows a Sudanese woman crying out in pain during a public flogging.

She was reportedly guilty of riding in a car with a man who wasn’t her husband or an immediate family member, an offense that is prohibited by Sudan’s public order law.

The woman, reportedly named Halima, crouches on the ground and tries to cover her head with a light pink cloth while a police officer walks around her with a whip, stopping to aim before lashing out at her body.

At about 0:39 seconds into the video, the police officer warns the woman, “This is so you don’t get into cars anymore,” according to France24.

A crowd of onlookers stands nearby, simply watching while the woman is attacked.

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Escaped North Korean Refugee Reveals Nation’s Desire for Nuclear Weapons, Intense Persecution

As North Korea continues defying the concerns of the world by going ahead with its third nuclear test, refugees from the troubled country have spoken out to reveal the extreme religious persecution believers are suffering in the isolated Pacific nation.

North (R) and South Korean soldiers stand guard.
(Reuters/Kim Kyung-Hoon)

SOURCE

“They ignore all freedoms. The human rights level is zero percent. Religions are not allowed. The leader of North Korea (Kim Jong-Un) has to be worshipped as god and this will not change unless the regime collapses,” said a man identified as “Timothy,” a 24-year old North Korean refugee.

Timothy has revealed to Open Doors USA, a persecution watchdog group, that he was tortured almost to the point of death for trying to escape to China nine years ago. He added that the government is “preoccupied with nuclear tests.”

The U.N. Security Council has “strongly condemned” the nuclear test, with outgoing Pentagon chief Leon Panetta calling North Korea and Iran “rogue states” for their insistence on carrying out nuclear tests.

UN chief Ban Ki-moon has said the test was a “clear and grave violation” of U.N. guidelines. North Korea, on the other hand, has reacted by promising “even stronger” action against the U.S. and its allies, which it has called “the sworn enemy of the Korean people.”

Open Door’s 2012 World Watch List of the worst persecutors around the world has named North Korea top of the list for 11 straight year. The Pacific country reportedly allows virtually no religious freedom, and Christians are routinely jailed, forced to work in labor camps, and sometimes executed.

Just last month, two North Korean Christians were confirmed to have been killed simply for their faith, according to Open Doors. One believer was shot while leaving for Bible training in China, and the other died at a labor camp in North Korea.

Jerry Dykstra, a spokesman for Open Doors USA, has said: “We believe that is only the tip of the iceberg. Research estimates there are as many as 70,000 Christians in the gulags out of an estimated 200,000 prisoners.”

“I remember they showed us cartoons and animated movies about bad Christians,” Timothy shared of the 15 years he spent in North Korea. “The Christian God was a monster for me. However, when I was 11, I witnessed the public execution of a Christian. His crime was that he had hidden tiny Bibles in the roof of his house.”

“The same year a lady was shot,” the refugee continued. “She had escaped to China and went to church there, but a North Korean spy discovered her activities. He had her arrested and sent back to North Korea, where she was also killed in public. I am convinced these practices still occur in my country. As for myself, I learned to trust in God. Thanks to Him, I am still alive.”

Open Doors shared the story of another refugee, identified as “Joo-Eun,” who also explained that religious freedom does not exist in North Korea.

“People are simply killed if they believe in Jesus. Kim Jong-Un is god and there cannot be any god besides him,” Joo-Eun added, referring to the current “supreme leader” of the North Korean people.

“Nowhere else in the world can you find a three generation dictatorship,” the refugee continued. “Yes, there are church services in North Korea, but only when foreigners are present. The state calls up some locals to be present. There is no freedom of religion, speech or press in North Korea.”

Analysts fear that North Korea is building toward developing small warheads capable of launching long-range missiles that could reach the United States, and Pyongyang is getting closer to possessing the nuclear capabilities that could potentially cause wide-spread damage.

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In graduate thesis, John Brennan argued for government censorship: ‘Too much freedom is possible’

(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

www.dailycaller.com  –  Charles C. Johnson

In his 1980 graduate thesis at the University of Texas at Austin, John Brennan denied the existence of “absolute human rights” and argued in favor of censorship on the part of the Egyptian dictatorship

“Since the press can play such an influential role in determining the perceptions of the masses, I am in favor of some degree of government censorship,” Brennan wrote. “Inflamatory [sic] articles can provoke mass opposition and possible violence, especially in developing political systems.”

Brennan serves as President Barack Obama’s national security advisor. Obama has nominated him to lead the Central Intelligence Agency.

The thesis, “Human Rights: A Case Study of Egypt,” was a requirement for Brennan’s Master of Arts degree in government with a Middle Eastern studies concentration. It grew out of his time studying at the American University in Cairo.

Brennan did not respond to emailed requests for comment from The Daily Caller.

Central to Brennan’s presentation was a relativist view of human rights, which he said include “security, welfare, liberty, and justice.”

“These four rights reflect not only my own moral concept of human rights [but] also my interpretation of the Western human rights perspective,” Brennan wrote in his introduction.

“I don’t feel that the possible forfeiture of rights under certain circumstances precludes their inalienability.”

Brennan ultimately concluded that human rights do not exist because they cannot be “classified as universal.”

“The United States should be expected to pass a more strict human rights test [than Egypt] because its environment is more conducive to the realization of those rights,” Brennan concluded. “An economic comparison between Egypt and one of its wealthy Arab neighbors such as Saudi Arabia or Kuwait would be equally unfair due to the wealth of those countries.”

“[T]he stage of economic development and political development have a direct impact on human rights,” he wrote. “The former enables a political system to offer its citizens welfare (e.g. health services) and security (e.g. military defense).”

Paradoxically, Brennan also claimed Egyptian rulers’ repressive regimes were part of that nation’s move toward democracy.

“[I]f democracy is a process rather than a state, the democratic process may involve, at some point, the violation of personal liberties and procedural justice,” he wrote. “[Anwar] Sadat’s undemocratic methods, therefore, may aim at the ultimate preservation of democracy rather than its demise.”

Brennan justified Sadat’s use of emergency powers to crack down on protests from communists because Egyptian citizens’ “exercis[e] of democratic rights would have an adverse affect on stability and even on democracy itself. This implies that too much freedom is possible and in the end, even detrimental to the cause of democracy.”

“[W]ould the ability to demonstrate effectively increase human rights and democracy in Egypt?” Brennan asked rhetorically. “In the light of the political environment, probably not. At the present stage of political development in Egypt widespread open opposition to the administration would be beyond the capacity of the system to handle.”

Brennan conceded that his explanation of why it is sometimes acceptable to abuse human rights “can provide a convenient excuse for any authoritarian leader in any country of the world.”

“Can human rights violations in the Soviet Union be as easily justified in terms of the preservation of the communist ideology? Unfortunately (looking at events from a democratic perspective), yes. Since the absolute status of human rights has been denied, the justification for the violation of any of those rights has to be pursued from a particular ideological perspective. Leonid Brezhnev could justify human rights violations in the Soviet Union as a necessary part of the preservation of the communist ideological system.”

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