Americans More Interested in Miley Cyrus, Football Than Obamacare or Govt. Shutdown

Vast majority content to watch pop star lick sledgehammer while country collapses

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
October 7, 2013

Despite Obamacare and the government shut down directly impacting hundreds of millions of people, interest in Miley Cyrus and football still continues to completely dominate the attention of most Americans.

Hot Google Searches

The graph above shows the top Google Trends for yesterday, with football taking the top four spots, WWE wrestling in 5th and Miley Cyrus’ Saturday Night Live appearance in 6th. The rest of the top 10 is taken up by more football, along with speculation about whether Cressida Bonas will marry Prince Harry.

Nothing about the government shutdown or Obamacare appears in the top 16 trends.

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Leaked Document Reveals Government Paid Millions to PRISM Participants

Government offered millions to tech companies in exchange for unlimited consumer data access

Julie Wilson
Infowars.com
August 23, 2013

As recently as this past June, nine U.S. tech companies denied their involvement and/or participation in the National Security Agency’s (NSA) data-mining program, known as PRISM.

Photo:  By Thomas Tolkien via Wikimedia Commons

Photo: By Thomas Tolkien via Wikimedia Commons

Tech Crunch reported that Google, Apple, Facebook, Dropbox, Microsoft, Paltalk, AOL and Yahoo have all “categorically denied” their participation in the tyrannical NSA program.

According to a new RT report, documents leaked to the Guardian newspaper revealed that not only did some of the tech companies participate, but they were paid millions to do so.

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Mark of the beast? Motorola pushes human tattoo to replace digital ‘smartphone’ passwords

Ethan A. Huff
Natural News
June 20, 2013

Desperate to make a comeback in the mobile phone market, technology giant Motorola, which is now owned by Big Brother spying shill Google, has developed a few solutions to a problem that does not actually even exist: the “chore” of having to type in a short passcode to access your locked cell phone. Yes, Motorola thinks this split-second step is somehow too laborious for the average consumer, and has thus come up with two potential new methods of accessing “smart phones” that involve either tattooing yourself with an electronic bar code or swallowing a pill that contains a small microchip.

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Motorola Working on Digital Tattoos, Password Pill

Electronic Tatto   mark of the beast

SOURCE

Besides releasing in October 2013 the Moto X smartphone, Motorola Mobility’s first handset since it was acquired by Google, the company is working on new methods that would make remembering passwords unnecessary.

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FBI Demands Customer Information From Google

Google ordered to hand over customer data to FBI WITHOUT warrants, citing counter-terrorism initiative

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A federal judge has ruled that Google must comply with the FBI’s warrantless demands for customer data, rejecting the company’s argument that the practice of issuing so-called national security letters was unconstitutional and unnecessary.

MARCH 23, 2010 FILE PHOTO


Virginia Mayo/AP
A federal judge has ruled that Google Inc. must comply with the FBI’s warrantless demands for customer data, rejecting the company’s argument that the government’s practice of issuing so-called national security letters to telecommunication companies, Internet service providers, banks and others was unconstitutional and unnecessary.

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Eric Schmidt: Google AI Indistinguishable From Humans Within a Decade

Technology to pass Turing test within 5-10 years

google robots

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
May 24, 2013

Google CEO Eric Schmidt has predicted that the company will be capable of developing artificial intelligence for its programs that will be indistinguishable from a human being within 5-10 years.

During a question and answer session at Google’s Big Tent event, which took place this week at the luxury Grove Hotel in Watford, UK, Schmidt responded to the question, “How soon before Google Now passes the Turing test?”

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Google’s Plan To Take Over The World

Google

Steve Kovach
Business Insider
May 19, 2013

Google‘s big keynote at its I/O developers conference this week wore me out.

Not because it lasted a grueling three hours and fifty minutes, but because of what was announced. With every new product update, every new feature, every new virtual service, it became more and more clear that Google isn’t just a search company that makes loads of cash by showing you ads. It’s creeping into every aspect of our digital, physical, and private lives at an exponential rate.

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FBI ‘secretly spying’ on Google users, company reveals

FoxNews.com

Google National Security Letters 1.jpg

Mar. 5, 2013: Google has revealed some information about the FBI’s use of National Security Letters to seek information — an unprecedented win for privacy, experts said. (Google)

The FBI used National Security Letters — a form of surveillance that privacy watchdogs call “frightening and invasive” — to surreptitiously seek information on Google users, the web giant has just revealed.

Google’s disclosure is “an unprecedented win for transparency,” privacy experts said Wednesday. But it’s just one small step forward.

“Serious concerns and questions remain about the use of NSLs,” the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Dan Auerbach and Eva Galperin wrote. For one thing, the agency issued 16,511 National Security Letters in 2011, the last year for which data was available. But Google was gagged from saying just how many letters it received — leaving key questions unanswered.

“The terrorists apparently would win if Google told you the exact number of times the Federal Bureau of Investigation invoked a secret process to extract data about the media giant’s customers,” Wired’s David Kravets wrote. He described the FBI’s use of NSLs as a way of “secretly spying” on Google’s customers.

National Security Letters are a means for the FBI to obtain information on people from telecommunications companies, authorized by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (ECPA) and expanded under the Patriot Act. It lets the agency seek information on a subscriber to a wire or electronic communications service, although not things like the content of their emails or search queries, Google said.

And thanks to secrecy constraints built into NSLs, companies that receive them usually aren’t even allowed to acknowledge the request for information. Citing such extreme secrecy, privacy experts have decried the use of these letters in the past.

“Of all the dangerous government surveillance powers that were expanded by the USA PATRIOT Act, the National Security Letter (NSL) power … is one of the most frightening and invasive,” the EFF wrote. “These letters … allow the FBI to secretly demand data about ordinary American citizens’ private communications and Internet activity without any meaningful oversight or prior judicial review.”

Thanks to negotiations with the government, Google finally opened the smallest chink in the armor, allowing the search giant to reveal the fact that it had received these requests for data, as well as some general information about them.

“Visit our page on user data requests in the U.S. and you’ll see, in broad strokes, how many NSLs for user data Google receives, as well as the number of accounts in question,” Richard Salgado, Google’s legal director of law enforcement and information security, wrote in a Tuesday blog post.

A new table posted to Google’s Transparency Report site outlines the details; it tabulates how many requests for information the company has received over each of the past four years: some undisclosed number between 0 and 999. With those NSLs, the FBI sought information on somewhere between 1,000 and 1,999 users/accounts.

“People don’t always use our services for good, and it’s important that law enforcement be able to investigate illegal activity,” Salgado wrote.

No other technology company presently disclose such basic information about government requests, experts noted.

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