U.S. Army to Buy Millions of Russian Rounds of Ammo and Popular Civilian Firearms

Compelling proof Dept. of Defense is also drying up firearms and ammo supply.

Kit Daniels
Infowars.com
July 26, 2013

The U.S. Army is now looking to stockpile nearly 3,000,000 live rounds of Soviet-era Russian ammo popular with civilian shooters.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

A U.S. Army solicitation posted July 18 on the Federal Business Opportunities web site asks for “non-standard” ammunition from vendors which includes:

– 2,550,000 rounds of 7.62x39mm ball ammo
– 575,000 blank rounds of 7.62x39mm ammo and
– 425,000 rounds of 9x18mm Makarov ball ammo

The army intends to store all these rounds in ammo storage facilities at both Camp Stanley in Boerne, Texas and the Blue Grass Army Depot in Kentucky.

As the solicitation implies, the 7.62x39mm and the 9x18mm Makarov are not standard-issue in the U.S. military or NATO.

Rather they are calibers developed by the former Soviet Union which are now commonly used by civilian shooters in the United States.

The 7.62x39mm in particular is extremely popular with private gun owners due to the wide availability and affordability of both military surplus ammo and firearms chambered for this round, such as the AK-47 and the SKS.

Handguns chambered for the 9x18mm Makarov, such as the FEG PA-63, are common, inexpensive imports.

The desired list of calibers attached to a previous, related acquisition request also included oddball rounds such as the .303 British and the 7.62×25mm Tokarev.

In addition to this solicitation for nearly 3,000,000 live rounds of Russian calibers popular with the public, the army made a similar request last year for a long-term weapon supplier who can ship both foreign non-standard and obsolete U.S. military weapons anywhere in the world.

According to this 2012 request, the U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) wanted to find a vendor who could “reach around the world at any given moment to gather and provide multiple types of weapons and weapon parts.”

The extensive list of desired weapons included firearms popular with civilians such as the aforementioned AK-47, 1911s, M1903 Springfields, Walther PP/PPKs (another common import), and other “commercial and para-military weapons.”

This solicitation also asked for “books, manuals, tools, and gauges” pertaining to the firearms.

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U.S. Marines rattled by bullet shortage

Rank and file told to conserve as Big Sis buys by the billion

Marine flag sequester

At least one branch of the U.S. military is scrimping and saving every bullet it can while the Department of Homeland Security is on a bullet-buying spree.

Marine Corps Commandant James F. Amos blames sequester budget cuts for causing the Corps to have to scrimp and save every bullet.

In a video to Marines, he says, “I ask you to save every round, every gallon of gas, that you take every single aspect, or opportunity, in training to get the most bang for the buck.”

“This is no time to do business as usual. Things have changed. The landscape has changed. I need you to be conservative in the way we do business,” Amos continued.

Sequester cuts do not seem to have slowed down the massive purchase of bullets by DHS. WND bas been closely following the department’s big buildup of ammo, reporting how DHS bought more than 1.6 billion rounds of ammunition over the last year.

Members of Congress are demanding the Obama administration explain why it is stockpiling a huge arsenal of ammunition and weapons. “They have no answer for that question. They refuse to answer to answer that,” said Rep. Timothy Huelscamp, R-Kan.

“I think Congress should ask the department about both of those issues, and I would like a full explanation as to why that has been done, and I have every confidence that the oversight committee … should ask those questions,” said Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J.

DHS has argued that it is buying in bulk to save money, explaining it uses as many as 15 million rounds a year for training law enforcement agents. But the 1.6 billion rounds of ammo would be enough for more than 100 years of training.

Additionally, the DHS is buying hollow-point bullets, which experts say are rarely used for training exercices. The DHS ordered 240,000 hollow-point rounds last month and has now placed an order for 360,000 more rounds.

It’s not just the Marines who are struggling to get by. Even local law enforcement agencies are having a tough time finding ammo.

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin said she believes the federal government is building an arsenal to prepare for civil unrest if the country goes bankrupt.

And retired U.S. Army Captain Terry M. Hestilow has written a letter to Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas warning that “the recent appropriation of weapons by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) that can only be understood as a bold threat of war by that agency, and the Obama administration, against the citizens of the United States of America.”

Homeland Security hoarding ammo, depriving police

Cops scramble for bullets while DHS stockpiles 1.2 billion rounds

130118ammo

Will the U.S. soon face a critical situation in which the federal government– primarily the Department of Homeland Security – possesses an ammunition surplus while local and state authorities face ammunition shortages and backlogs in purchasing more rounds?

Current trends could find the federal government with a strong ammunition advantage over local police and sheriff departments.

 Earlier this week, a Georgia TV station reported that police officers training at the Chatham County Sheriff’s Office Gun Range were holding back on some live-range ammunition training due to shortage concerns.

Range Master Sgt. Ted Glisson told WSAV-TV in Savannah, “What we’ve incorporated is we’re doing more dry firing practice and this basically gets some people better suited to do what they need to when they come out here on the range.”

Dry firing is pulling the trigger but not firing a bullet.

Glisson said that while his unit currently had enough ammunition, he was concerned because “one of our suppliers was running short on what they had because there’s a mass – everybody’s trying to get a lot of ammunition and things like that.”

Similar reports are cropping up nationwide amid fears of a federal clampdown as the Obama administration continues to push gun legislation in the wake of the Sandy Hook massacre.

Brownells, the largest supplier of firearm accessories in the world, reported it had sold several years’ worth of ammunition in just a matter of hours.

The company released a statement apologizing for the delay in fulfilling orders, explaining the it had experienced “unprecedented” demand for AR-15 ammunition magazines since earlier in the week.

CNS News reported police departments nationwide are experiencing ammunition shortages, referring to the online law enforcement website, PoliceOne.com

Sgt. Chris Forrester of the Greer Police Department in South Carolina told local TV-news channel WSPA: “It’s never easy to get ammo, but since the tragedy in Connecticut, it’s become even more difficult.”

Forrester explained the problem ordering ammunition began about a month ago.

“You’ll call and they say ‘sorry we’re out,’ or ‘it’s on back order,’” he said.

Chief Terry Sult of the Sandy Springs Police Department said: “It affects our ability to be prepared. It affects the potential safety of the officers, because they’re not as proficient as they should be.”

While local authorities scramble to fulfill future ammunition needs by turning to the same suppliers from which private gun owners purchase their rounds, the Department of Homeland Security reportedly maintains a large stock of ammunition.

Last March, DHS reportedly ordered 450 million rounds of .40 caliber ammunition, including hollow point bullets, from defense contractor ATK to be delivered over five years.

Hollow-point tip bullets are rarely used in training exercises. They are among the deadliest bullets, with the ability to pass through barriers and expand for a bigger impact without the rest of the bullet warping.

In April, Business Insider reported on an additional DHS request for 750 million more rounds for a total of at least 1.2 billion bullets. The 750 million is more than 10 times what U.S. troops used in a full year of Iraqi combat.

It was not immediately clear how many bullets were delivered to DHS.

In 2009, manufacturer Winchester posted an award to its site affirming it will deliver 200 million rounds to DHS over five years, serving as yet another order on top of others that may have already been partially fulfilled, as Business Insider noted.

DHS runs a large weapons training program at its Firearms Division replete with indoor and outdoor firing ranges, ammunition and weapons storage. Courses include a rifle-training program, precision rifle observer training program, reactive shooting instructor training program, submachine gun instructor training program and a survival shooting training program.

“That doesn’t make the most recent batch of 200,000 rounds seem out of line, but those billion or so rounds, seem like they could be better accounted [for],” commented Robert Johnson at Business Insider earlier this month.

With additional research by Joshua Klein

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