Lava Flows From Indonesian Volcano

Indonesia Volcano

Mount Slamet spews lava and gas during its eruption as seen from Pandansari village in Brebes, Central Java, Indonesia, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. (AP Photo/Idhad Zakaria) The Associated Press

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Tungurahua volcano in Ecuador: Increased activity

Tungurahua volcano erupts near Banos on 31 August, 2014.

Tungurahua volcano erupts near Banos on 31 August, 2014. The volcano was dormant until 1999 but has since become active again.

Seismologists in Ecuador say the Tungurahua volcano is showing increased activity

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More hot gases erupt from rumbling volcano in western Indonesia; 15K evacuated in 3-mile zone

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In this late Sunday, Nov. 24, 2013 photo, Mount Sinabung spews volcanic ash into the air as seen from Tiga Pancur, North Sumatra, Indonesia. Authorities raised the alert status for one of the country’s most active volcanoes to the highest level Sunday after the mountain repeatedly sent hot clouds of gas down its slope following a series of eruptions in recent days. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) (The Associated Press)

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Mexico eyes Popocatepetl volcano constantly

Like doctors with a cranky, dangerous patient, Mexico’s volcano watchers notice every blink, breath, sneeze and cough of Popocatepetl.

Mexico watches Popocatepetl volcano: Popocatepetl spews ash and vapor July 9 behind San Damian Texoloc, Mexico.

Mexico watches Popocatepetl volcano: Popocatepetl spews ash and vapor July 9 behind San Damian Texoloc, Mexico.

MEXICO CITY (AP) — In a clean, hushed room in the south of Mexico City, cameras, computer screens and scrawling needles track the symptoms of a special patient, as they have every second of every day for the past two decades. The monitors indicate that “Don Goyo” is breathing normally, even as he spews hot rock, steam and ash.

That kind of activity isn’t unusual for the 17,886-foot volcano, Mexico’s second-highest, whose formal name is Popocatepetl, or “Smoking Mountain” in the Aztec language Nahuatl. But this volcano, personified first as a warrior in Aztec legend and now as an old man grumbling with discontent, is in the middle of two metro areas, where his every spurt can put 20 million people on edge.

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