Florence likely ‘the storm of a lifetime’ for Carolinas: National Weather Service


(SOURCE)    Hurricane Florence, a powerful Category 4 storm moving closer to North and South Carolina, will bring wind and waves that may be “nothing like you’ve ever seen,” North Carolina Gov. Ray Cooper said Tuesday.

“This storm is a monster,” Cooper told reporters at a news conference. “It’s big and it’s vicious. It is an extremely dangerous, life threatening, historic hurricane.”

“This will likely be the storm of a lifetime for portions of the Carolina coast,” the National Weather Service spokesperson in Wilmington said Tuesday night. “I can’t emphasize enough the potential for unbelievable damage from wind, storm surge, and inland flooding with this storm.”

The storm is forecast to make landfall early morning Friday between midnight and 5 a.m. as a major hurricane.

FEMA administrator Brock Long warned that power could be knocked out for weeks.

“This has an opportunity of being a very devastating storm,” Long said Tuesday. “The power will be off for weeks. You’re going to be displaced from your home in coastal areas. There will be flooding in the inland areas as well.”

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services declared a public health emergency in North Carolina and South Carolina on Tuesday.

“These actions help ensure that Americans who rely on Medicare and Medicaid have continuous access to the care they need when the storm makes landfall,” said HHS Secretary Alex M. Azar.

PHOTO: Hurricane Florence Forecast TrackABC News
Hurricane Florence Forecast Track
PHOTO: Hurricane Florence ImpactsABC News
Hurricane Florence Impacts

One serious danger is flooding.

“All the predictions are when it gets to the coast it’ll be moving slow so it’ll be dumping rain on us and North Carolina for a long time,” South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster told “Good Morning America” Tuesday. “This hurricane is big and strong and it’s bigger than Hurricane Hugo, which we had back in 1989.”

Heavy rain could flood hog manure pits and industrial sites in North Carolina, according to the Associated Press. That tainted water could wash into houses, and affect drinking water.

PHOTO: Michael Schwartz (L) and Jay Schwartz secure plywood over the windows of their business ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Florence, Sept. 11, 2018, in Myrtle Beach, S.C.Joe Raedle/Getty Images
Michael Schwartz (L) and Jay Schwartz secure plywood over the windows of their business ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Florence, Sept. 11, 2018, in Myrtle Beach, S.C.more +

North Carolina and Virginia could get up to 30 inches of rain while Richmond, Virginia, and Washington, D.C., could see more than 10 inches of rain.

PHOTO: Hurricane Florence Rainfall ForecastABC News
Hurricane Florence Rainfall Forecast

Storm surge is also a major threat, potentially reaching 12 feet in some areas.

PHOTO: Hurricane Florence Storm SurgeABC News
Hurricane Florence Storm Surge
PHOTO: Hurricane Florence Storm SurgeABC News
Hurricane Florence Storm Surge

As the storm churns ahead with 130 mph winds, states of emergency have been declared in South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland and Washington, D.C.

Residents and visitors on South Carolina’s coast were ordered to evacuate Tuesday.

PHOTO: Mike Herring with Franks Ice Company unloads another pallet of ice as people buy supplies at The Home Depot on Monday, Sept. 10, 2018, in Wilmington, N.C.AP
Mike Herring with Frank’s Ice Company unloads another pallet of ice as people buy supplies at The Home Depot on Monday, Sept. 10, 2018, in Wilmington, N.C.more +

Boeing is suspending its operations in South Carolina because of the storm threat.

Some coastal areas of North Carolina and Virginia are also under mandatory evacuation orders.

Some Virginia inmates are among those evacuating, according to the state’s Department of Corrections.

PHOTO: Walker Townsend, at right, from the Isle of Palms, S.C., fills a sand bag while Dalton Trout, in center, holds the bag at the Isle of Palms municipal lot in preparation for Hurricane Florence at the Isle of Palms S.C., Monday, Sept. 10, 2018.AP
Walker Townsend, at right, from the Isle of Palms, S.C., fills a sand bag while Dalton Trout, in center, holds the bag at the Isle of Palms municipal lot in preparation for Hurricane Florence at the Isle of Palms S.C., Monday, Sept. 10, 2018.more +

Slideshow: Worst hurricanes in US history
SLIDESHOW: Slideshow: Worst hurricanes in US history

ABC News’ Jason Volack contributed to this report.

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3 thoughts on “Florence likely ‘the storm of a lifetime’ for Carolinas: National Weather Service

    • Thanks for your comment Christine!

      I lived on the East Coast of the United States for years, in Florida most of that time. We had threats of hurricanes each season, but there were those seasons and storms that were very concerning such as now with hurricane Florence.

      Some times people in the known path of the storm were warned to evacuate but it was not mandatory, other times people were told that they had to evacuate such as many of the areas now with hurricane Florence. When people evacuated an area they just got in their cars and drove as far as they could out of harms way, most with no where to go. And most of the time people fled the area just hours before the storm came, even a day before, freeways, roads, highways all packed with cars, bumper to bumper, stop and go, mostly just stopped, many of them stranded on a highway in the midst of the storm, its a nightmare! Hundreds of thousands of people if not millions trying to get out, all going in the same direction, not really going anywhere but away, I’ve seen it happen over and over again. I have heard that its close to 2 million people that have been told to evacuate for hurricane Florence, that’s a mandatory evacuation not a recommendation!

      There was really no where to go except further away, many people don’t have the money to drive hundreds of miles and pay for hotels, many people just slept in their cars along the road side, and there are so many people trying to get hotel rooms that they become full very quickly (even hundreds of miles away). If a person and their family does not leave days before the storm then they will find themselves in a huge mess with no where to go or stay. Grocery stores also run out of food and water quickly, supply houses run out of batteries, flash lights, generators, plywood, etc.

      These storms are something that must be prepared for ahead of time, if you don’t then you find yourself and your family in trouble. But most of the time you don’t know just what the hurricane will do as they often change course. I’ve seen that happen in Florida as well, people fled a specific area, then the hurricane changed direction and went directly where they fled to for safety! Sometimes you think that you are fleeing the storm but are actually heading right into it, talk about a nightmare, I’ve seen it happen. Me and my family decided to just stay put and weather the storm out, not really knowing if it would hit us directly or change path, thank God it did change path somewhat, but we did still get some of the storm and it was bad enough! We didn’t have anywhere to go, and the freeways were jam packed with cars for hundreds of miles. I figured that it was safer for us to just stay put then to get stuck along the road somewhere in the middle of the storm, and so many people do the same thing.

      So to answer your question, there really isn’t anywhere for these people to be evacuated to! They are supposed to just get out and get away, its a huge logistical mess (nightmare). It would be nice if there were some sort of shelters set up by the government, I do know that many schools, churches, etc. open their doors to these victims for shelter, however I don’t believe that there is any formal government plan for masses of people to evacuate. I remember during hurricane Katrina in Louisiana they opened up the football stadium for people to camp out in. We’ve heard a lot about those FEMA camps, where are they when we really need them?!

      The people in the path of the storm need our prayers, for safety, health, peace, comfort, and protection.

      God bless! Maranatha!

  1. Yes I have heard a lot of worrying things about Fema. so best stay out of them if possible. I pray for the people it must be very frightening experience.
    Christine

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