Islamic State: Orlando shooter ‘one of our soldiers in America’

Mourners pay tribute to the victims of the Orlando shooting during a memorial service in San Diego, California on June 12, 2016. (AFP PHOTO / Sandy Huffaker)

Mourners pay tribute to the victims of the Orlando shooting during a memorial service in San Diego, California on June 12, 2016. (AFP PHOTO / Sandy Huffaker)

Jihadist radio claims Omar Mateen as member after deadliest gun attack in US history; authorities probe killer’s link to group

(SOURCE)  The Islamic State terror group claimed the gunman who killed 50 people at an Orlando nightclub Sunday was “one of the soldiers of the caliphate in America,” in a radio broadcast Monday.

Mateen, 29 and from Port St. Lucie, Florida, killed 50 people and wounded dozens more when he opened fire inside the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida early Sunday morning, the deadliest shooting attack in US history. He died in a shootout with SWAT police after a several-hour standoff, and police have been probing a possible link between Mateen and the Islamic State group.

“God allowed Omar Mateen, one of the soldiers of the caliphate in America, to carry out an attack entering a crusader gathering in a night club… in Orlando in Florida, killing and wounding more than 100 of them,” a bulletin from Al-Bayan radio said.

The IS-linked news agency Amaq said Sunday without providing evidence that one of its fighters carried out the attack, and an FBI source said Mateen had called the agency before carrying out the attack claiming he was a follower of IS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

Omar Mateen, 30, from Port St. Lucie, Florida, is the suspected gunman in a mass shooting attack that killed 50 at an Orlando gay nightclub, according to police, June 12, 2016. (MySpace)

Omar Mateen, 30, from Port St. Lucie, Florida, is the suspected gunman in a mass shooting attack that killed 50 at an Orlando gay nightclub, according to police, June 12, 2016. (MySpace)

US officials were already investigating possible links of Mateen to radical Islamism, including suspicions he may have been an Islamic State operative.

While officials admitted that Mateen had previously been probed for a connection to a suicide bomber — with the link ruled “minimal” — the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee said law enforcement was looking back to see if it had any more information on Mateen.

Rep. Adam Schiff said in a statement that the American intelligence community was “combing through its holdings, checking what we have on the shooter, and coordinating with local law enforcement in the investigation.”

Schiff said similarity between last year’s terror attack on the Bataclan Theater in Paris and the shooter’s targeting of the LGBT community during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan “indicates an ISIS-inspired act of terrorism.”

Ray Rivera, left, a DJ at Pulse Orlando nightclub, is consoled by a friend, outside of the Orlando Police Department after a shooting involving multiple fatalities at the nightclub, Sunday, June 12, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

Ray Rivera, left, a DJ at Pulse Orlando nightclub, is consoled by a friend, outside of the Orlando Police Department after a shooting involving multiple fatalities at the nightclub, Sunday, June 12, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

“Whether this attack was also ISIS-directed remains to be determined,” Schiff said.

In the aftermath of the shooting, the FBI announced that Mateen had been twice investigated for possible extremist Islamic views, but was never prosecuted.

He first came to the attention of investigators in 2013 after making inflammatory comments to co-workers indicating possible terrorist ties. The following year, the agency investigated Mateen’s possible contact with Moner Mohammad Abusalha, a fellow Floridian and the first US citizen to carry out a suicide bombing in Syria.

FBI agents investigate near the damaged rear wall of the Pulse Nightclub on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images/AFP)

FBI agents investigate near the damaged rear wall of the Pulse Nightclub on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images/AFP)

“The FBI thoroughly investigated the matter, including interviews with witnesses, physical surveillance and records checks,” Special Agent Ronald Hopper told reporters Sunday. “Ultimately we were unable to verify the substance of his comments and the investigation was closed.”

“We determined the contact was minimal and did not constitute a substantive relationship or a threat at that time,” he said.

Asked if the gunman had a connection to radical Islamic terrorism, Hopper said authorities had “suggestions that individual has leanings towards that.”

Orlando Police officers direct family members away from a multiple shooting at a nightclub in Orlando, Fla., Sunday, June 12, 2016. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

Orlando Police officers direct family members away from a multiple shooting at a nightclub in Orlando, Fla., Sunday, June 12, 2016. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

Mateen’s family was from Afghanistan, and he was born in New York. His family later moved to Florida, authorities said.

His ex-wife, Sitora Yusufiy, told reporters that her former husband was bipolar and “mentally unstable.”

Mateen was short-tempered and had a history with steroids, she said in remarks televised from Boulder, Colorado. He wanted to be a police officer and applied to a police academy, but she had no details.

“After a few months he started abusing me physically … not allowing me to speak to my family, keeping me hostage from them,” Sitora Yusufiy said.

Yusufiy, who met Mateen online and married him in 2009, said he was a practicing Muslim but showed no signs of radicalization.

She noted that Mateen was “mentally unstable and mentally ill” and had a history of steroid use.

The couple was together for only four months, and the two had no contact for the last seven or eight years, she said.

Mateen purchased at least two firearms legally within the last week or so, according to Trevor Velinor of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

Mateen was a security guard with a company called G4S. In a 2012 newsletter, the firm identified him as working in West Palm Beach. In a statement sent Sunday to the Palm Beach Post, the company confirmed that he had been an employee since September 2007. State records show that Mateen had held a firearms license since at least 2011.

A law enforcement official said the gunman made a 911 call from the club in which he professed allegiance to the leader of the Islamic State, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The official was familiar with the investigation, but was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

But relatives interviewed by US media on Sunday said Mateen, who had a wife and young son, was not especially religious.

They did, however, describe a man who had anti-gay views.

Orlando police officers seen outside of Pulse nightclub after a fatal shooting and hostage situation on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The suspect was shot and killed by police after 50 people died and more than 50 injured. (Gerardo Mora/Getty Images/AFP)

Orlando police officers seen outside of Pulse nightclub after a fatal shooting and hostage situation on June 12, 2016 in Orlando, Florida. The suspect was shot and killed by police after 50 people died and more than 50 injured. (Gerardo Mora/Getty Images/AFP)

His father Mir Seddique told NBC News his son may have been motivated by homophobia, insisting: “This had nothing to do with religion.”

He said his son had seen two men kissing while in south Florida a couple of months ago.

“We were in downtown Miami, Bayside, people were playing music,” the shocked father told NBC News in the immediate aftermath of the shooting. “And he saw two men kissing each other in front of his wife and kid and he got very angry,” Seddique said.

Tribute signs are placed on statues depicting homosexual couples in a park near the Stonewall Inn where a vigil was held following the massacre that occurred at a gay Orlando nightclub on June 12, 2016 in New York City. Monika Graff/Getty Images/AFP)

Tribute signs are placed on statues depicting homosexual couples in a park near the Stonewall Inn where a vigil was held following the massacre that occurred at a gay Orlando nightclub on June 12, 2016 in New York City. Monika Graff/Getty Images/AFP)

“We are saying we are apologizing for the whole incident,” Seddique said. “We are in shock like the whole country.”

US President Barack Obama called the shooting an “act of terror” and an “act of hate” targeting a place of “solidarity and empowerment” for gays and lesbians. He urged Americans to decide whether this is the kind of “country we want to be.”

Authorities said they had secured a van owned by the suspect outside the club. Meanwhile, a SWAT truck and a bomb-disposal unit were on the scene of an address associated with Mateen in Fort Pierce, about 120 miles southeast of Orlando.

Across the country, police departments stepped up patrols in neighborhoods frequented by the LGBT community.

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