Mass immigration could see water shortages, failing hospitals – and we won’t feel richer, says Civitas

The large scale population growth, fuelled by immigration, could cause water to be rationed in some parts of the country

The large scale population growth, fuelled by immigration, could cause water to be rationed in some parts of the country.

The report from Civitas found that large-scale immigration will have a negative effect on standards of living as any economic benefits will be outweighed by pressures

(SOURCE)  Uncontrolled immigration could lead to water shortages, overcrowded classrooms, failing hospitals and the need for hundreds of new cities to cope with Britain’s booming population, a new report warns.

The report from Civitas found that large-scale immigration will have a negative effect on standards of living as any economic benefits will be outweighed by pressures imposed by a much bigger population.

In a report on economic consequences of immigration, Cambridge University economist Robert Rowthorn said any gains would be small compared to strains placed on amenities such as housing, schools and hospitals.

The 85-page report that as a result gross domestic product would grow as a whole but GDP per capita would be only marginally affected by projected population growth forecast for the coming century.

Mr Rowthorn, Emeritus Professor of Economics at Cambridge University, said: “Unrestrained population growth would eventually have a negative impact on the standard of living through its environmental effects such as overcrowding, congestion and loss of amenity.”

Net migration has been above 225,000 a year every year for the past decade – it has fallen back recently but is still over 200,000. At these rates, the report said population will increase by a projected 20million over the next 50 years and by 29million over the next 29 years. “This growth would be almost entirely due to migration,” it said.

Immigration on this scale would mean that the average of the population would fall in the shorter term – but would only be kept low by more immigration.

The consequences would be felt across the country. It said that this large scale population growth, fuelled by immigration, could cause water to be rationed in some parts of the country.

The report said that that some “water-stressed regions of England and Wales” in the south-east and east of England were comparable with Spain and Italy.

Referring to an Environment Agency study on water shortages, it said: “Population growth is identified in this report as a major source of strain on water resources.”

Other public services will also be hit. It said: “Population growth may lead to housing shortage and pressure on public facilities such as schools, hospitals and the transport infrastructure.

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