Canada’s Supreme Court strikes down anti-prostitution laws

  A woman, who requested to withhold her name, holds a sign during a rally at Allan Gardens park to support Toronto sex workers and their rights in Toronto, Friday Dec. 20, 2013. Canada's highest court struck down the country's anti-prostitution laws Friday, a victory for sex workers who had argued that a ban on brothels and other measures made their profession more dangerous. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Mark Blinch)

Canada’s highest court struck down the country’s anti-prostitution laws Friday, finding they violated sex workers’ right to life, liberty, and security. Here, a woman holds a sign in a rally to support sex workers in Toronton on Friday.     Mark Blinch/The Canadian Press via AP

The unanimous decision — a victory for sex workers who had argued that some measures made their profession more dangerous — found that bans on brothels and street solicitations were unconstitutional. Canada’s Parliament has one year to respond before the decision takes effect.

(SOURCE)  Canada’s highest court struck down the country’s anti-prostitution laws Friday, but it didn’t go all the way to put its ruling into effect immediately.

Instead, the court gave Parliament a year to respond with new legislation and said existing laws would remain in place until then.

The decision is a victory for sex workers who had argued that a ban on brothels and other measures made their profession more dangerous.

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